Focus on Film History and Theory 1

Zobrazit rozvrh

Kód Zakončení Kredity Rozsah Jazyk výuky Semestr
311FFHT1 ZK 2 36 hodiny PŘEDNÁŠEK za celý semestr (45 minut), 23 až 33 hodin domácí příprava anglicky zimní

Garant předmětu

Petra DOMINKOVÁ

Jméno vyučujícího (jména vyučujících)

Martin ČIHÁK, Petra DOMINKOVÁ, Nicholas David HUDAC, Vít JANEČEK, Erik Sherman RORABACK

Výsledky učení dané vzdělávací složky

By the end of the course the students will be able to:

•understand the history of the cinema since its beginning until the 1970s and its specificity;

•define certain trends and movements in the history of the cinema until the 1970s, as is “New Wave”, “German Expressionism, “Soviet montage school”, “French Impressionism”, “New Hollywood”, etc.;

•explain the differences between classical, modern, and postmodern cinema and evaluate how each of these “cinemas” approaches its subject;

•analyze editing of any film and explain its peculiarities and understand the vocabulary connected with the editing;

•analyze the narration of any film and explain its peculiarities;

•define the main genres and understand its development;

•explain various modes of production;

•defend – or critique – the concept of auteur;

•discuss how film festivals changed the film-making, its production, and distribution.

•define avant-garde cinema and explain the various “types” of experimental film-making

•analyze the sound of any film and explain its peculiarities.

•understand the vocabulary connected with the sound

•explain various modes of distribution

•discuss the realistic trends in history and nowadays

•discuss TV and its development

Forma studia

The course partially consists of lectures, partially of seminars. A necessary part of the course is a screening of a film. The film extracts will be shown as well.

Předpoklady a další požadavky

Willingness to read, think, speak, write and learn about the questions related to film history and theory is the only prerequisites.

Obsah kurzu

The main aim of the course is to prepare the CDM students to their state exam from film history and theory, therefore its content overlaps with the state exam questions. During the fall term, the following themes (and questions) will be covered:

  1. Silent cinema and establishment of film language
  2. The concept of classical, modern, and postmodern cinema
  3. Soviet montage school and various approaches towards editing
  4. “Isms“ in cinema (German expressionism, French Impressionism, Surrealism)
  5. Classical Hollywood Cinema and the stabilization of genres
  6. New Waves and modern cinema
  7. New Hollywood: its historical context and consequences
  8. “Auteur” cinema: its establishment and development; the culture of film festivals from the 60s on
  9. “Realistic” trends in cinema: kino-pravda, Italian neorealism, cinema vérité, Dogma, etc.
  10. Trends in contemporary cinema (post-2000)
  11. Principles of Narrative Construction (plot, story, narration, cause-effect, three-act vs. five-act structure)
  12. Types of Montage (Eisenstein typology; Christian Metz; continuity vs. discontinuity editing)
  13. Sound: types and functions
  14. The concept of avant-garde cinema: past, present, and future
  15. Various modes of production and distribution in history and nowadays
  16. Television, its development, and formats

Doporučená nebo povinná literatura

Balázs, Béla. Theory of the Film: Character and Growth of a New Art. London: D. Dobson, 1952. Print.

Bazin, André. What Is Cinema? Montreal: Caboose, 2009. Print.

Bernard, Sheila Curran. Documentary Storytelling. Routledge, 2015.

Bordwell, David, and Kristin Thompson. Film Art: An Introduction. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2010. Print.

Bordwell, David, and Kristin Thompson. Film History: An Introduction. The McGraw Hill Higher Education, International Edition, 2003. Print.

Bordwell, David, Janet Staiger, and Kristin Thompson. The Classical Hollywood Cinema. Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960. New York : Columbia University Press, 1985. Print.

Bordwell, David. Narration in the Fiction Film. Madison, Wis: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985. Print.

Bordwell, David. On the History of Film Style. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998. Print.

Bordwell, David. Poetics of Cinema. New York and London: Routledge, 2008. Print.

Braudy, Leo, and Marshall Cohen. Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. Print.

Caldwell, John Thornton. Production Culture. Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film and Television. Duke University Press Books, 2008-

Carroll, Noël. The Philosophy of Motion Pictures. Wiley-Blackwell, 2007.

Chion, Michel. Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen. Columbia University Press, 1994.

Cook, David A. A History of Narrative Film. New York: W. W. Norton, 2004. Print.

Dancyger, Ken. The Technique of Film and Video Editing. Routledge, 2010.

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1: The Movement-Image. University of MinnesotaPress, 1986 + Cinema 2: The Time-Image. University of MinnesotaPress, 1989. Print.

Eisner, Lotte H. The Haunted Screen: Expressionism in the German Cinema and the Influence of Max Reinhardt. California-Berkeley. University of California Press, 2008. Print.

Falzon, Christopher. Philosophy goes to the movies. Routledge, 2014. Print.

Field, Syd. Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting. Dell Publishing, 1994. Print.

Hames, Peter. The Czechoslovak New Wave. London, New York: Wallflower Press, 2005. Print.

Hayward, Susan. Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts. New York: Routledge, 2000. Print.

Kozloff, Sarah. Invisible Storytellers: Voice-Over Narration in American Fiction Film. University of California Press, 1989.Print.

Kozloff, Sarah. Overhearing Film Dialogue. Ewing, NJ: University of California Press, 2000. Print.

Kracauer, Siegfried. From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological History of the German Film Princeton University Press, 2004. Print.

Kracauer, Siegfried. Theory of Film: The Redemption of Physical Reality. New York: Oxford University Press, 1960. Print.

LeGrice, Malcolm. Abstract Film and Beyond. London. MIT Press, 1977.

Mazierska, Ewa. Masculinities in Polish, Czech and Slovak Cinema: Black Peters and men of marble. New York: Berghahn Books, 2008. Print.

McGowan, Todd. The Real Gaze: Film Theory after Lacan. SUNY Press, 2008. Print.

Metz, Christian. Film Language: A Semiotics of the Cinema. University of Chicago Press, 1990. Print.

Monaco James. How to read a film: The Art, Technology, Language, history, and Theory of Film and Media. Oxford University Press, 1977. Print.

Monaco, James. The New Wave: Truffaut, Godard, Chabrol, Rohmer, Rivette. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1977. Print.

Nichols, Bill, ed. Movies and Methods ed. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 1976 (vol. 1 + vol. 2). Print.

Nichols, Bill. Introduction to Documentary. Indiana University Press, 2001.

Peterson, James. Dreams of Chaos, Visions of Order: Understanding the American Avant-Garde Cinema. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1994.

Reisz, Karel. The Technique of Film Editing. Routledge, 2009.

Schonnaschein, David. Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. Michael Wiese Productions, 2001.

Sitney, P. Adams.Visionary Film. The American Avant-Garde, 1943 – 2000. Oxford University Press, 2002.

Sklar, Robert. Movie Made America. New York: Vintage, 1975. Print.

Škvorecký, Josef. All the Bright Young Men and Women. Baseline Books, 1975. Print.

Thompson, Kristin, Storytelling in the New Hollywood: Understanding Classical Narrative Technique. Cambridge, Massachusetts and London: Harvard University Press, 1999. Print.

Vertov, Dziga. Kino-Eye: The Writings of Dziga Vertov. University of California Press, 1984. Print.

Žižek, Slavoj, ed. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock. Verso, 2010. Print.

Hodnoticí metody a kritéria

Class Attendance: The students are expected to attend all classes. If a student is sick, has another duty (e.g. needs to be present on the shooting), or troubles with his/her wi-fi connection, s/he needs to apologize to the professor ahead, otherwise, the absence is treated as unexcused.

Class Participation: Participation in the class discussion will be significantly taken into account in the final assessment. Participation means a meaningful contribution in the classroom, utilizing the resources and materials presented to students as part of the course. Students are required to actively, meaningfully and thoughtfully contribute to class discussions and all types of in-class activities throughout the class. Meaningful contribution requires students to be prepared, as directed, in advance of each class session. Particularly, students will read the text(s) required for each lesson. All students will be ready to discuss the readings in the class. Lively discussion is expected. Students are expected to ask clarification questions if they cannot follow the instructor’s or other students’ line of thought or argumentation. Into the account will be taken results of any partial assignments the students receive during the term by any of the professors.

Final test: Test on the material covered in the course, 10 questions, each for 5% of the grade. Students will have two options to write a test. Will be written during the exam period, after the term: Dates TBA

Assessment and final grade:

The final grade will be calculated as follows: Class Participation (50%); final test or another assignment(s) (50%)

Poznámka

-Schedule:

Oct-1 (Petra Dominková)

  1. Principles of Narrative Construction (plot, story, narration, cause-effect, three-act vs. five-act structure)

Oct-8 (Petra Dominková)

  1. “Realistic” trends in cinema: kino-pravda, Italian neorealism, cinema vérité, Dogma, etc.

Oct-15 (Petra Dominkova)

  1. Classical Hollywood Cinema and the stabilization of genres
  2. New Hollywood: its historical context and consequences
  3. Various modes of production and distribution in history and nowadays (production part)

Oct-22 (Nick Hudač)

  1. New Waves and modern cinema
  2. “Auteur” cinema: its establishment and development; the culture of film festivals from the 60s on

Oct-29 (Martin Cihak)

  1. Soviet montage school and various approaches towards editing
  2. Types of Montage (Eisenstein typology; Christian Metz; continuity vs. discontinuity editing)

Nov-5 (Erik Roraback)

Session 1:

  1. Silent cinema and establishment of film language
  2. The concept of classical, modern, and postmodern cinema
  3. “Isms“ in cinema (German expressionism, French Impressionism, Surrealism)

Nov-12 (Erik Roraback)

Session 2:

  1. Silent cinema and establishment of film language
  2. The concept of classical, modern, and postmodern cinema
  3. “Isms“ in cinema (German expressionism, French Impressionism, Surrealism)

Nov-19 (Martin Čihák)

  1. The concept of avant-garde cinema: past, present, and future

Nov-26 (Sheida Sheikhha):

  1. Trends in contemporary cinema (post-2000) – Xavier Dolan

This workshop at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague is a part of the project “Narcissism and the Cinema of Xavier Dolan” supported by special-purpose funds as intended for the specific tertiary education research provided by the Ministry of Education in the year 2021.

Dec-3 (Ondřej Zach)

  1. Various modes of production and distribution in history and nowadays (distribution part) + 20. Television, its development, and formats (Ondřej Zach)

Dec-10 (Veronika Klusáková)

  1. Trends in contemporary cinema (post-2000)

Dec-17 (Jakub Kudláč)

  1. Sound: types and functions

Rozvrh na zimní semestr 2022/2023:

06:00–08:0008:00–10:0010:00–12:0012:00–14:0014:00–16:0016:00–18:0018:00–20:0020:00–22:0022:00–24:00
Po
Út
St
Čt

místnost 241
Učebna 3 (FAMU)

(Lažanský palác)
DOMINKOVÁ P.
09:50–14:45
(přednášková par. 1)
Datum Den Čas Vyučující Místo Poznámky Č. paralelky
09:50–14:45 Petra DOMINKOVÁ Učebna 3 (FAMU)
Lažanský palác
přednášková par. 1

Rozvrh na letní semestr 2022/2023:

Rozvrh zatím není připraven

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